Psychology of countering radicalisation

    By Muhammed Nawaz Khan, The Express Tribune Dated: February 01,2018       The counter-terrorism phenomenon as observed in the contemporary world today is getting complicated. Hard measures alone are not enough to deal with the threat of terror. Counter-terrorism policies must also include psychological measures designed to lure people away from terror groups. ‘Soft power’ inventiveness is needed to develop more humane methods. An example of this is the Disengagement, De-Radicalisation and Rehabilitation (DDR) programmes in Pakistan. The country needs more creative, innovative and unconventional strategy based…

Growing Trends of Female ‘Jihadism’ in Bangladesh

By Nazneen Mohsina of RSIS Counter Terrorist Trends and Analyses   Volume 9, Issue 8 |  August 2017 In recent months, Bangladesh has witnessed an upsurge of female participation in „jihadist‟ groups in diversified roles. Since the ISdirected Holey Artisan Bakery attack in July 2016, Bangladeshi militant groups have become more assertive and violent. At the same time, they have also developed a transnational outlook and linkages. The  role of female Bangladeshi „jihadists‟ have evolved from passive to active and from peripheral to central as suicide bombers and combatants. This change…

European Counter-Radicalisation and De-radicalisation: A Comparative Evaluation of Approaches in the Netherlands, Sweden, Denmark and Germany

By Riazat Butt and Henry Truck Institute for Strategic Dialogue | Cross-Country Evaluation Report Introduction This report is a comparative assessment of approaches to counter-radicalisation and de-radicalisation within four countries from the European Policy Planners’ Network (EPPN). It begins by setting out the definitions of key terms. It then provides an overview of the recent history of extremist violence and the approaches taken in tackling radicalisation and facilitating de-radicalisation in the Netherlands, Sweden, Denmark and Germany in order to contextualise the environment in which the programmes examined in the report…

Mosques launch anti-radicalisation scheme as alternative to Prevent

By Haroon Siddique, The Guardian Dated: March 22,2018 An anti-radicalisation programme billed as an alternative to the government’s much-maligned Prevent Strategy has been launched in mosques. Safe and Secure, which is being backed by the Muslim Council of Britain (MCB), is the brainchild of former senior Muslim Police Officer, Dal Babu, and Mike Howes, a former council head of community safety, both strong critics of Prevent. The government’s flagship anti-radicalisation strategy has attracted condemnation from many Muslims, who see it as a tool for spying on them, but also from teachers and even the government’s…

Islamic State after the Fall of Mosul and Raqqa: Impact on Organisation and Propaganda

By Syed Huzaifah Bin Othman Alkaff and Remy Mahzam RSIS Counter Terrorist Trends and Analyses Volume 10, Issue 1 |  January 2018 The ‘Islamic State’ (IS) After the Fall of Mosul and Raqqa: Still a Persistent Threat  The year 2017 marked the defeat of IS in Iraq and Syria, three years after it declared the establishment of a caliphate‘ in June 2014. The group has lost all its strongholds including Mosul in Iraq and its de facto capital‘ Raqqa in Syria, and almost all the lands it controlled. It has…

Global Threat Forecast : South Asia :Afghanistan, Pakistan, Bangladesh and India

By Abdul Basit , Sara Mahmood, Iftekharul Bashar , Mohammed Sinan Siyech and Teertha Samal of RSIS Counter Terrorist Trends and Analyses Volume 10, Issue 1 |  January 2018 Introduction  South Asia, along with the Middle East and Africa, were among the most affected regions by terrorism in 2017. The worst hit were Afghanistan and Pakistan. In the face of the rapidly changing situation in the Middle East, particularly the defeat of the Islamic State (IS) terrorist group, the South Asian threat landscape has evolved continuously. In addition to the lingering…

Radicalisation: Examining a Concept, its Use and Abuse

By Paul Hedges Counter Terrorist Trends and Analyses Volume 9, Issue 10 |  October  2017 Synopsis  This article explores some recent literature on radicalisation and its policy implications. In particular, it questions the common use and understanding of radicalisation, and focuses on the diverging arguments of two French scholars, Giles Kepel and Olivier Roy about pathways to radicalisation. The article also examines the link between radicalisation and “Militant Neo-Islamist Jihadism”, and makes recommendations on dealing with the phenomenon discussed.   Introduction  As a concept, a lot can be said about radicalisation.…