Why Jihadists Loved America in the 1980s

By Thomas Hegghammer, The Atlantic March 6, 2020 It was freezing cold with gusting winds in Indianapolis on New Year’s Day 1978. While much of the city was presumably waking to a hangover, the Islamic Teaching Center was busy hosting prominent preachers from the Middle East. Among them was Abdallah Azzam, a 36-year-old rising star of the Jordanian Muslim Brotherhood. In Indianapolis, Azzam would meet a young Saudi student with a now-famous name: Osama bin Laden. It was a historic moment, one that marked the rise of an extensive jihadist…

How Video Games could facilitate Radicalization Processes

By Linda Schlegel , European Eye on Radicalization Dated: March 13,2020 In Steven Spielberg’s Ready Player One, the lead character escapes the harsh reality of his daily life by playing a massive virtual reality game, stating that this game is the “only place that feels like I mean anything” and that “it’s a place where the limits of reality are your own imagination (…) People come to OASIS for all the things they can do, but they stay for all the things they can be.” The virtual reality game offers an…

Ghazwa-e-Hind and Indian Ulema?

New Age Islam, Dated: May 15, 2020 Our ulema should introspect deeply, and better decide to come out of their seventh century mindset, which is still celebrating Jang-e-Badr and other battles. We need a new theology, a theology of peace and pluralism, a theology of gender justice, free from patriarchal bias. ISIS is presenting a powerful Jihadi narrative based on the theology of the consensus of all sects in Islam. We need a coherent counternarrative, which is internally consistent and makes sense to the modern Muslim, living in the 21st…