Pathways to Jihad: A Thematic Analysis of 310 Cases

By Kacper Rekawek, Viktor Szucs,Martina Babikova and Katsiaryna Lozka Counter Extremist Project, GLOBSEC Policy InstituteFor the last year and a half, GLOBSEC has been studying the phenomenon of a crime-terror nexus in Europe.1 Its research team has built up a dataset of 348 individuals arrested for terrorism off ences, expelled for alleged terrorist connections, or who died while staging terrorist attacks in Europe in 2015, the peak year of European jihadism. The dataset covers the 11 European countries, all within the EU, who reported the highest number of terrorism arrestees to EUROPOL (European Police…

What Does the Islamic State’s Organisational Restructuring Tell Us?

By Dr. Colin P. Clarke International Centre for Counterterrorism (ICCT), The Hague Dated: June 03, 2019 Over the course of recent weeks, the Islamic State (IS) announced that it had established a new province in India, the wilayah of Hind, after attacks on security forces in the Kashmir region. IS has also been responsible for an uptick of attacks in Pakistan under the auspices of the wilayah of Pakistan. The attacks in Pakistan, both of which took place in Quetta, were directed against the Pakistani police and another against the…

Foreign Terrorist Organizations

Bureau of Couterterrorism and Countering Violent Extremism Country Reports on Terrorism 2017, US Department of State     Designations of Foreign Terrorist Organizations (FTOs) expose and isolate the designated terrorist organizations, deny them access to the U.S. financial system, and create significant criminal and immigration consequences for their members and supporters. Moreover, designations can assist or complement the law enforcement actions of other U.S. agencies and other governments. In 2017, the Department of State designated Hizbul Mujahedeen as a FTO. The Department of State also amended the FTO designations of…

The Insurgent Sanctuary in Pakistan

  By Steth G Jones Centre for Strategic & International Studies Dated: September 11, 2018   The Issue Despite tough talk from Washington, Taliban leaders continue to enjoy a sanctuary in Pakistan and support from Pakistan security agencies. A review of insurgencies since World War II suggests that groups like the Taliban, which retain a sanctuary in neighboring states, either win insurgencies or successfully drag them out. If Washington is serious about ending the war in Afghanistan—including through a peace settlement—it needs to put significant pressure on the Taliban and…

Jamaat-ud Daawa: Into the Mainstream

  By Animesh Roul  Combating Terrorism Center (CTC) Dated: May 19,2015       How did Pakistan’s Jamaat-ud Dawa (JuD) transform itself from a terrorist organization into a legitimate political actor? Animesh Roul cites two major reasons – the organization’s support for the government and armed forces, and its efforts to improve its reputation through humanitarian activities.   Pakistan’s Jamaat-ud Dawa (JuD) is often compared with Lebanon’s Hezbollah thanks to its efforts at blending charitable works and Islamic proselytization with overt political activism. The JuD is consciously attempting to improve…

A Predictable Failure: The Political Economy of the Decline of the Islamic State

    By Jacob N Shapiro  Combating Terrorism Center (CTC) Dated:September 22, 2016   The so-called Islam State’s (IS) failure as a state was economically preordained, says Jacob Shapiro. Trying to fight a three-front war for territory – against the Kurds to the North, the Assad regime to the West, and Iraq to the East – saw to that. So did the large area IS controlled in late 2014, which had only a modestly productive economy before the group arrived and governing institutions that were inimical to economic growth.  …

The Age of Selfie Jihad: How Evolving Media Technology is Changing Terrorism

  By Jason Burke Combating Terrorism Centre Dated: December 14, 2016   According to Jason Burke, rapid changes in media technology have enabled terrorists to reach large audiences quickly and directly without having to launch large-scale attacks that require significant physical infrastructure. Indeed, thanks in part to the digital revolution, jihadists can now increasingly rely on what the Syrian strategist Abu Musab al-Suri called “individual terrorism.”   Extremists have sought to exploit the latest media technology to instill fear in target populations and elicit support from sympathetic audiences. In order…