To What Extent Did Attacking the Sources of ISIL’s Funding Operations Contribute to the Weakening of The Islamic State?

By Daniel Porter,International Counter TerrorismYouth Network (ICTYN) Student Paper Series 2018 | Issue 02 AbstractThis article examines the impact attacking the sources of Islamic State’s funding operations had on weakening the Caliphate. Delineating between kinetic and nonkinetic operations to target Islamic State’s funding, this article highlights the inefficacy of national, regional and international attempts to weaken the group through targeting their relationship to the international financial system, as this relationship was largely non-existent. Rather, the targeting of oil infrastructure, cash depots, and population centres had a more significant effect due to the…

The Global Movement of Moderates: An Effective Counter to ISIS?

By Kumar Ramakrishna Rajaratnam School of International Studies, Singapore Dated: August 06, 2015 Synopsis: Amongst the various global initiatives debated to counter the violent extremist ideology of the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS), one example from Southeast Asia – the Global Movement of Moderates – is worth closer scrutiny. Moderation, however, is not just for Muslims.Commentary: INTERNATIONAL CONCERN at the rapidly metastasising global threat of the brutal Al Qaeda “mutation” known as the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS), has generated concerted discussions on effective strategies to…

The Hardline Stream of Global Jihad: Revisiting the Ideological origin of the Islamic State

By Tore Hamming, Combating Terrorism Centre January 2019, Volume-12, Issue-1 Abstract: The Islamic State has lost almost all its territorial control in Syria and Iraq and thus a central part of its claim to constitute a caliphate. As the international community takes stock, it is necessary to discard the myth of the group simply being a product of al-Qaida. Despite its history as a local al-Qaida affiliate in Iraq, the Islamic State developed from an ideological and cultural trend born in late-1980s Afghanistan that was always in tension with the…

“I want to be the last girl in the world with a story like mine”: Nadia Murad

By Muna Adil, Quilliam International Dated: October 09, 2018 On Friday 5th October, Yazidi campaigner Nadia Murad became the joint winner of the 2018 Nobel Peace Prize along with Congolese gynaecologist and activist Denis Mukwege. Nadia, 25, and Mukwege, 63, were presented the esteemed award “for their efforts to end the use of sexual violence as a weapon of war and armed conflict”.Nadia, now the second youngest Nobel winner after 17-year-old Malala Yousafzai was awarded the same prize in 2014, said:“I share this award with all Yazidis, with all the Iraqis,…

IS Footprint in Pakistan: Nature of Presence, Method of Recruitment, and Future Outlook

By Farhan Zahid, RSIS Counter Terrorist Trends and Analyses Volume 9, Issue 5 | May 2017 Since its formation in 2014, terrorist attacks and violent incidents linked to the Islamic State (IS) terrorist group have risen steadily in Pakistan. IS in Pakistan has been active, with varying degrees, in all four provinces of the country and has forged tactical alliances with like-minded local militant groups. Looking ahead, IS is likely to assert its dominance through local affiliates in urban centres of Pakistan, specifically the Punjab province. Introduction In June 2014,…

What ISIS Really Wants

www.theatlantic.com Dated: March 2015 what is the islamic state?Where did it come from, and what are its intentions? The simplicity of these questions can be deceiving, and few Western leaders seem to know the answers. In December, The New York Times published confidential comments by Major General Michael K. Nagata, the Special Operations commander for the United States in the Middle East, admitting that he had hardly begun figuring out the Islamic State’s appeal. “We have not defeated the idea,” he said. “We do not even understand the idea.” In the past…

‘I got cheated. All of us got cheated’: Captured German Isis member says he regrets joining terror group

By Richard Hall, The Independent Dated: Feb 08, 2019 Lucas Glass had not long finished school when he decided to join Isis. In the summer of 2014, shortly after the terror group declared its global caliphate, he left his home city of Dortmund and set off with his wife to start a new life in Syria. He was just 19 years old.“All I knew about Isis was that they were establishing Islamic law and fighting Bashar al-Assad,” he says, cutting a solemn figure under the watchful eye of his captors at…

The Five Myths of the ISIS Repatriation Debate

By Amarnath Amarasingam and Leah West  Dated: 18 October 2019 As we head into the Canadian federal election next week, one of the many pressing issues facing the new government will be the question of what to do with the nearly 40 Canadian men, women, and children currently in Kurdish custody in northeastern Syria. We visited the camps and the prisons over the course of a week earlier this month, and the challenges we documented were immense and since the invasion by Turkey, those problems are only getting worse. On…

The difficult diplomacy involved in returning former ISIS fighters and their families

By Michael Birnbaum,The Washington Post Dated: February 23, 2019Brussels — Western countries are scrambling to figure out what to do with the thousands of their citizens who joined the Islamic State, as the militant group loses the last of its territory in Syria and a U.S. military pullout puts pressure on the camps where many have been living.In public, many countries appear to be doing their best to avoid taking back former fighters and their families. Although President Trump has insisted that Europe repatriate its fighters, the United States is…

Why ISIS Propaganda Works

By Charlie Winterwww.theatlantic.comFebruary 13, 2016As it stands, the international coalition is far from winning the information war against the Islamic State. Its air strikes may be squeezing the group in Iraq and Syria and killing many of its leaders, but that has not halted the self-proclaimed caliphate’s ideological momentum. Indeed, at the end of 2015, it was estimated that the number of foreigners travelling to join militant groups in Iraq and Syria—predominantly the Islamic State—had more than doubled in the course of just 18 months. What’s more, while these figures…