Why Jihadists Loved America in the 1980s

By Thomas Hegghammer, The Atlantic March 6, 2020 It was freezing cold with gusting winds in Indianapolis on New Year’s Day 1978. While much of the city was presumably waking to a hangover, the Islamic Teaching Center was busy hosting prominent preachers from the Middle East. Among them was Abdallah Azzam, a 36-year-old rising star of the Jordanian Muslim Brotherhood. In Indianapolis, Azzam would meet a young Saudi student with a now-famous name: Osama bin Laden. It was a historic moment, one that marked the rise of an extensive jihadist…

Extremist thought

Extremist thought Sl. No. Khawārij tweet Counter tweet 1  The jāhiliyya of the Muslims means Islam no longer exists Extremist thinking is the seed of civil strife and enmity inside Muslim societies and opens a host of problems 2 Islam as we know it no longer exists on Earth Extremist thought emerges from a perspective that Islam itself rejects since it leads people to violence, and this is dangerous to humanity 3 Our organization (i.e. jamā‘a) is the savior of the umma Believing you are right and everyone else is…