The Hadith that Prevented Muslims From Joining ISIS must be an Eye-Opener for the sympathizers of Jihadism

New Age islam, November 30,2020 Previously we argued that The Jihadists’ Use of the Black Flag Narrative Is Not Reliable In the Eye of Hadith-Scholars and Hence Should Not be Acceptable. This time we have brought the reliable Hadith of Hazrat Ali (the Fourth caliph of Islam and the son in-law of the Prophet) which the readers must be shocked to see in the context of the present-day Jihadists in common and the ISIS in particular. The text of the Hadith is as clear as required to substantiate that the…

The Evolution of the Salafi-Jihadist Threat: Current and Future Challenges from the Islamic State and Al-Qaeda

By Seth G. Jones Charles Vallee Danika Newlee Nicholas Harrington Clayton Sharb Hannah Byrne Centre for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS), Washington With the collapse of the Islamic State’s socalled caliphate in Iraq and Syria, there is a critical need to assess the current state and future evolution of Salafi-jihadist groups. U.S. strategy documents like the National Security Strategy note that the United States has “crushed Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) terrorists on the battlefields of Syria and Iraq, and will continue pursuing them until they are destroyed.”…

Why Jihadists Loved America in the 1980s

By Thomas Hegghammer, The Atlantic March 6, 2020 It was freezing cold with gusting winds in Indianapolis on New Year’s Day 1978. While much of the city was presumably waking to a hangover, the Islamic Teaching Center was busy hosting prominent preachers from the Middle East. Among them was Abdallah Azzam, a 36-year-old rising star of the Jordanian Muslim Brotherhood. In Indianapolis, Azzam would meet a young Saudi student with a now-famous name: Osama bin Laden. It was a historic moment, one that marked the rise of an extensive jihadist…

Time to recall and refute the Tahrik-e-Balakot, the first Jihadist movement in the Indian subcontinent

New Age Islam, 28 February 2019 New Age Islam has reproduced timely pieces on the Balakot-based jihadist movements which can be traced back to 1831 when the two Indian Sunni-origin Wahhabi clerics, Syed Ahmed Rai Barelvi Maulana Ismail Dehlawi were killed in a battle with the army of the Sikh emperor Ranjit Singh. In his article, Uday Mahurkar rightly points out that “Balakot’s symbolic and sentimental value for terror outfits, such as Jaish-e-Mohammed (JeM) and Lashkar-e-Taiba (LeT), has been there for almost two centuries now”.Even the prominent Pakistani historian Ayesha Jalal…

The Demographics of Southeast Asian Jihadism

  By Daveed Gartenstein,Valens Global War on the Rocks September 05, 2018     Shortly after sunrise on July 31, soldiers at a military checkpoint outside Lamitan City in the Philippines’ Basilan province were hailed over to inspect a white 10-seat van suspected of bearing an improvised explosive device. Moments later, the bomb in the vehicle detonated, killing at least 10 people. Among the dead were four civilians, including women and a child.   The brief interactions between the van’s driver and soldiers prior to the blast suggested that the…

Jihadists Cannot Justify Their Call to Migration On The Basis Of The Quranic Verse 8:72

By Ghulam Rasool Dehelvi WordForPeace.com The Jihadist terrorists dominantly belong to Wahhabism and hence they call their Wahhabi followers to migrate like the early Emigrants mentioned in the Quranic verse 8:72 and fight against those who they think are Kuffar and non-Wahhabi Muslims. Concerning this verse in today’s context some questions arise. Are today’s Muslims whom they are calling to migrate identical to the early Emigrants? Is it allowed for them to migrate from a country which grants security and religious freedom to them? Associating the condition of today’s Muslims…

Jihadi Revisionism: Will It Save the World?

   By Khalil Al-Anani Crown Centre for Middle East Studies, Brandeis University, Massachusetts No. 35, April 2009 It is remarkable that even as al-Qaeda is stepping up violence and terrorism in Afghanistan, Iraq, Algeria, Yemen, and Saudi Arabia, a process of revisionism—of rethinking jihadi doctrine and philosophy—is gaining steam, presided over by leaders of formerly violent extremist groups who now profess the error of the thought and ideology that have guided them for the past two decades. The various revisionist efforts reinterpret religious texts and fatwas related to jihad with…

Radicalisation: Examining a Concept, its Use and Abuse

By Paul Hedges Counter Terrorist Trends and Analyses Volume 9, Issue 10 |  October  2017 Synopsis  This article explores some recent literature on radicalisation and its policy implications. In particular, it questions the common use and understanding of radicalisation, and focuses on the diverging arguments of two French scholars, Giles Kepel and Olivier Roy about pathways to radicalisation. The article also examines the link between radicalisation and “Militant Neo-Islamist Jihadism”, and makes recommendations on dealing with the phenomenon discussed.   Introduction  As a concept, a lot can be said about radicalisation.…

Threat of Urban Jihadism in South Asia

By Abdul Basit, RSIS Counter Terrorist Trends and AnalysesVolume 10, Issue 3 | March 2018Introduction In the last few years, the traction of IS ideology in South Asia has mobilised a new generation of radicals among the educated youth of urban middle and upper-middle classes. This generation of educated jihadists operate in a de-centralised manner in cell formations or as lone-wolf actors making their detection and eradication a challenging task. Moreover, with improvements in  urveillance capabilities of the security institutions to monitor the openend social media platforms, these militants have moved…