Growing Trends of Female ‘Jihadism’ in Bangladesh

By Nazneen Mohsina of RSIS Counter Terrorist Trends and Analyses   Volume 9, Issue 8 |  August 2017 In recent months, Bangladesh has witnessed an upsurge of female participation in „jihadist‟ groups in diversified roles. Since the ISdirected Holey Artisan Bakery attack in July 2016, Bangladeshi militant groups have become more assertive and violent. At the same time, they have also developed a transnational outlook and linkages. The  role of female Bangladeshi „jihadists‟ have evolved from passive to active and from peripheral to central as suicide bombers and combatants. This change…

Islamic State after the Fall of Mosul and Raqqa: Impact on Organisation and Propaganda

By Syed Huzaifah Bin Othman Alkaff and Remy Mahzam RSIS Counter Terrorist Trends and Analyses Volume 10, Issue 1 |  January 2018 The ‘Islamic State’ (IS) After the Fall of Mosul and Raqqa: Still a Persistent Threat  The year 2017 marked the defeat of IS in Iraq and Syria, three years after it declared the establishment of a caliphate‘ in June 2014. The group has lost all its strongholds including Mosul in Iraq and its de facto capital‘ Raqqa in Syria, and almost all the lands it controlled. It has…

Global Threat Forecast : South Asia :Afghanistan, Pakistan, Bangladesh and India

By Abdul Basit , Sara Mahmood, Iftekharul Bashar , Mohammed Sinan Siyech and Teertha Samal of RSIS Counter Terrorist Trends and Analyses Volume 10, Issue 1 |  January 2018 Introduction  South Asia, along with the Middle East and Africa, were among the most affected regions by terrorism in 2017. The worst hit were Afghanistan and Pakistan. In the face of the rapidly changing situation in the Middle East, particularly the defeat of the Islamic State (IS) terrorist group, the South Asian threat landscape has evolved continuously. In addition to the lingering…

Radicalisation of Campuses in Pakistan

By  Farhan Zahid, RSIS Counter Terrorist Trends and Analyses Volume 9, Issue 11 | November 2017 Radicalisation of youth at various university  campuses in Pakistan and the participation of a select few in militancy are a serious concern. This trend has generally been associated with the Islamic State (IS) terrorist group although it was pioneered by Al-Qaeda. While youth radicalisation is also not entirely new, it is a continuation of a historical trend that has existed since the 1990s. In this regard, the case study of youth radicalisation at the International Islamic University (IIUI) is instructive. Though IIUI is not the only university…

Islam and Suicide Terrorism: Separating Fact from Fiction

By Reid Hutchins, RSIS Counter Terrorist Trends and AnalysesVolume 9, Issue 11 | November 2017 Introduction A voice message by Osama Bin Laden, stating „We love death as you love life‟ in the aftermath of 9/11, set the tone for radicalisation and spurred the use of suicide terrorism as a predominant tactic employed by Al-Qaeda and presently, the Islamic State (IS) terrorist group as well. As such, Bin Laden‟s death slogan for Al-Qaeda has also become a rallying cry for other radical Islamist terrorists to kill and die. In recent times, a…

De-legitimising Al-Baghdadi’s ‘Caliphate’

By Ahmad Saiful Rijal Bin Hassan, RSIS Counter Terrorist Trends and Analyses Volume 9, Issue 11 | November 2017 Introduction On 29 June 2014, the Islamic State (IS) terrorist group declared the establishment of a caliphate after having captured large swathes of land in the greater Levant. Five days later, the group‟s leader, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi1 appeared for the first time delivering a sermon at the Great Mosque in Mosul, Iraq. He called on Muslims everywhere to pledge allegiance to him, after proclaiming himself as the new caliph for them. Baghdadi‟s self-proclamation was received with consternation and derision throughout the Muslim world. Prominent Muslim leaders and scholars…

Foreign, Political and Financial Influences on Religious Extremism: A Study of Madrassas in Punjab, Pakistan

By Hussain Mohi-ud-Din Qadri RSIS Counter Terrorist Trends and Analyses Volume 10, Issue 4 |  April 2018 Introduction In Pakistan, government and legislators believe some of the madrassas have close ties with radical, sectarian, militant, and political groups in and outside the country. These links encourage the students and administration of these madrassas to play an active political role. The madrassas are also financially vulnerable, leading them to accept funds from international and domestic political groups allegedly in return for pursuing policies, which may not necessarily be in the interest of the country. This paper studies the relationship of the madrassas in Pakistan with various…

Using Theology to Legitimise Jihadist Radicalism

By Syed Huzaifah Bin Othman Alkaff,RSIS Counter Terrorist Trends and AnalysesVolume 10, Issue 3 | March 2018Background A few months before Islamic State (IS)-affiliated terrorists attacked Marawi City on 23 May 2017, a young Muslim girl from Manila, Siti (not her real name), in a bid to atone for her ‘sinful life’, fell prey to IS’ social media groups called “da’wa” (preaching) which are  esponsible for spreading IS militant ideology online. Siti reached out to an IS recruiter on Facebook, Abu Yaqeen, who shared her story on his Facebook page as a testimony of his work. Before radicalisation, Siti had held mainstream…

Threat of Urban Jihadism in South Asia

By Abdul Basit, RSIS Counter Terrorist Trends and AnalysesVolume 10, Issue 3 | March 2018Introduction In the last few years, the traction of IS ideology in South Asia has mobilised a new generation of radicals among the educated youth of urban middle and upper-middle classes. This generation of educated jihadists operate in a de-centralised manner in cell formations or as lone-wolf actors making their detection and eradication a challenging task. Moreover, with improvements in  urveillance capabilities of the security institutions to monitor the openend social media platforms, these militants have moved…

Counterterrorism: ASEAN Militaries’ Growing Role By Rohan Gunaratna Synopsis

By Rohan Gunaratna , RSIS Commentry No. 042 – 13 March 2018 Synopsis Following its defeat in Iraq and Syria last year the self-proclaimed Islamic State (IS) has expanded to other parts of the Muslim world including Southeast Asia by linking up with local militant groups. Countries in the region recognise the need for stronger cooperation in counter-terrorism and are increasingly roping in their militaries. Commentary FOLLOWING THE shrinking of its battle space in Iraq and Syria, the group that calls itself Islamic State (IS) is expanding worldwide, including to Southeast Asia. Against the backdrop…