The Evolution of the Salafi-Jihadist Threat: Current and Future Challenges from the Islamic State and Al-Qaeda

By Seth G. Jones Charles Vallee Danika Newlee Nicholas Harrington Clayton Sharb Hannah Byrne Centre for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS), Washington With the collapse of the Islamic State’s socalled caliphate in Iraq and Syria, there is a critical need to assess the current state and future evolution of Salafi-jihadist groups. U.S. strategy documents like the National Security Strategy note that the United States has “crushed Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) terrorists on the battlefields of Syria and Iraq, and will continue pursuing them until they are destroyed.”…

Islamists and Salafists

By Ahmad Villasenor, quilliaminternational.com Dated: March 11, 2019 With religion having been largely relegated to the private sphere due in no small part to the secularising effect of the processes which culminated in the formation of the modern nation-state, this current state of affairs has given rise to concerns surrounding the assertive religious identities of many Muslim communities within the West. Chief among these concerns is the fear that gradual ‘Islamisation’ will result in a complete transmutation of the state and society. Amidst this discourse, the loose employment of terminology,…

Salafi-Jihad in Kashmir: New Cat among the Pigeons

  By Dr. Adil Rasheed, Institute for Defence Studies and Analyses Dated: May 15, 2017      For a long time Indian strategists have sought to devise a credible strategic communications programme against the devious indoctrination of the vulnerable sections in Kashmir society by Pakistan and Pakistan-controlled terror groups, which has increasingly taken on a religious colour, but is mainly directed at weaning the state of Jammu and Kashmir away from India. However, in the absence of any effective public relations or ideological counter-narratives campaign, it is ironic that the act…

Radicalisation: Examining a Concept, its Use and Abuse

By Paul Hedges Counter Terrorist Trends and Analyses Volume 9, Issue 10 |  October  2017 Synopsis  This article explores some recent literature on radicalisation and its policy implications. In particular, it questions the common use and understanding of radicalisation, and focuses on the diverging arguments of two French scholars, Giles Kepel and Olivier Roy about pathways to radicalisation. The article also examines the link between radicalisation and “Militant Neo-Islamist Jihadism”, and makes recommendations on dealing with the phenomenon discussed.   Introduction  As a concept, a lot can be said about radicalisation.…

Labelling IS Fighters: Khawarij, Not Jihadi-Salafis

 By Mohamed Bin Ali, RSIS Commentry  No. 063 – 4 April 2018 Synopsis Islamic State (IS) fighters are more suitably called Khawarij and not Jihadi-Salafis. An accurate labelling of them is important to avoid the wrong and misleading use of Islamic terms. Commentary The term ‘Jihadi-Salafis’ was first used by the French scholar Gilles Keppel in 2002 to describe a hybrid ideology in the anti-Soviet Afghan war. The event of September 11 saw this term widely used to refer to those Muslims who believe in using violence in the name of Jihad. They include members…